What is your excuse not to work remotely now?

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Unless you physically move things around at work or for work, you no longer have an excuse why you can not work remotely.

Welcome to remote work.

What took you so long? Did you have too many excuses? Let me clear them up for you.

If you have a hard time adapting to working from home or working remotely, suck it up and start doing it already. You have no more excuses and every reason to work remotely. This is the new normal. Get used to it. The office building does not miss you.

Remote work is nothing new. You were just missing out. Maybe it was not socially acceptable or you were constrained to one day a week because your employer had to justify using their bad real estate investment by keeping you coming back for more… commuting time. The fact is that really you don’t need an office to work nor work together today. Maybe you will realize this over the coming weeks and months.

You can actually accomplish more when working remotely if you:

  1. Have a computer that works quickly today. A laptop is commonplace nowadays so it can come with you where ever you want to work. A laptop might be issued by your employer.
  2. Have access to what you need to work with. Have fast internet bandwidth and steady power is a great start. You can get a mobile hotspot from even just about anywhere your mobile phone can if you don’t have internet available. VPN and permission to directory access to folders you might need are necessary too.
  3. Maintain focus (just like for any work if it is going to be done well)
  4. Manage your schedule for each day with an online calendar. Not just for work since you only have one set of 24 hours each day. Get things done in your life. Not just for work. That is why you are alive. Really.
  5. Work remotely at home and you don’t live alone, have a door that closes to block those living distractions (spouses, children, pets, other household dwellers, etc).
  6. Stop butt dragging. Get rid of unnecessary distractions. Turn off the TV (a crisis will still be there when you turn it back on and there will be a recap if it matters). Mute the phone, including the social media apps too since those are massive time sucks).
  7. Don’t commute to work. Walking further in your home is not a commute. Did you miss the traffic or hunting for a spot in the parking lot? Maybe they missed you. No tears were shed though.
  8. Stay away from the offices (drama, politics and pretend caring are all useless wastes of time) They don’t even justify the real estate spend for one desk nor how many square feet of office space your magic title will be allocated for you.
  9. Connect with people remotely online. That is why I use Zoom. I connect with clients that way, talk with friends that way and even record podcasts that way. Yes, you should collaborate online in a scheduled calendar fashion with the ‘location’ of a unique Zoom link.

If you don’t trust the people you work with, why are you still there? Find a new job or work for yourself.

If I can get 13-year-olds (with parental permission) to 80-year-olds to work via computer from their home remotely with me, so can you. And you thought your age was a good excuse? Think again. Do something productive already. Work and learn remotely.

I have worked from home for years now that I own my own businesses. I decline any new contracts/clients that are not remote. I was doing that well before COVID-19 became too popular. Why? I am a knowledge worker. An individual contributor. I am a consultant, podcaster and writer. I help people who want to be helped and ignore other distractions. I work in the digital world and have no interest in leaving my digital space.

Adapt to remote work already. You no longer have much choice.

If you want to work together, schedule a call with me here.

If you want me to come work in your office, contact someone else.

What is your excuse for not working remotely yet?

Questions?

Schedule a consulting call today

Tools I Use: digital mind mapping

Ryan Holiday explains “The Notecard System: The Key For Remembering, Organizing And Using Everything You Read.”

This system may work in the physical world (I respect that if you need everything to be physical for some reason).  I see all this possible as a digital mind map to minimize duplication (it is just a link or lines drawn to the same dot), less rewriting, simpler organization that travels with you anywhere and easier categorization for those comfortable using digital tools.

I find it interesting to watch people squirm while I explain how I do this using digital tools as they still have a reluctance (resistance) in giving up their legacy methods using paper due to their own comfort zones. If they don’t want to change and get out of their own (way) comfort zone, it is their own problem to solve.

I prefer tools and information to follow me anywhere/anytime rather than going to where it is all physically located in order to review/iterate it. Especially since new ideas are fleeting, need to be captured (vs. vanish with memory) and get linked to other ideas/needs at some point.

Yes, one of the tools I use is digital mind mapping. Not on a paper, but rather fully editable ideas. I find it a good tool for forming and dissecting ideas. Before creating an outline for a book, I start with a mind map. As I continue existing projects, I mind map them.

Mind mapping helps create dots (ideas) and connect those dots (drawing lines/relations) such as:

  1. keywords/keyphrases
  2. related articles (links)
  3. related images (links to drawings, photos, infographics whether they are mine in Google Drive or from the internet)

Then, it becomes clearer to see what gaps are there and which gaps you want to fill.

Once you are comfortable with scope (self-imposed limits) of ideas you want to cover (and what you don’t want to cover), it is easier to form an outline for writing a book.

I also use mind mapping to cover who and what topics I have covered with my podcast interviews and what I want to do in the future.

Here is a list of mind mapping tools you can use (free or paid). I happen to use Mind Meister.

And that is how I use mind mapping. How do you use mind mapping?

Need help with tools like this for your business?

Questions?

 

Creating a Kickstarter project?

Disclosure: Links to other sites may be affiliate links that generate us a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Back on 2013, I completed a Kickstarter project. It took months to plan, a month to fund and months to complete. For the most part, all went as planned.

Kickstarter is one of the most popular means of crowdfunding because it is rewards-based crowdfunding and it is an all-or-nothing funding model lowers the risk for all parties. It is also great for idea validation.

Many people have a lot of questions about Kickstarter, and they ask about this quite often due to the platform’s popularity. I want to answer your questions about Kickstarter.

I have given a presentation on Kickstarter: Lessons Learned to live audiences multiple times this year and crowdsourced all their questions.

After gathering audience questions, interviewing some other successful Kickstarter creators and compiling thoughts on what it takes to succeed with Kickstarter, I wrote an ebook about it.

I am presenting in person at GW on October 5, 2016, with this new ebook.

I wrote a short ebook about how to do a successful Kickstarter.

Success with Kickstarter: Lessons Learned

Success with Kickstarter: Lessons Learned

 

Follow this blog if you wish to be notified about the upcoming webinar where I will answer your questions.

Questions?