Webinar Recording: DAM Success with Remote Working Part 1

In case you missed the DAM Success: Remote Working Part 1 webinar, here is the video recording.

This webinar was a panel discussion about Remote Work within the field of Digital Asset Management (DAM). This moderated and organized by Frank De Carlo along with Henrik de Gyor, Jennifer Anna, Ian Matzen, and Theresa Burt.

Part 1 was designed for DAM professional employees (practitioners, not just DAM vendors).

Part 2 will be meant for the DAM professional employers (DAM clients, not just DAM vendors)

Questions?

Schedule a consulting call today

What is your excuse not to work remotely now?

Disclosure: Links to other sites may be affiliate links that generate us a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Unless you physically move things around at work or for work, you no longer have an excuse why you can not work remotely.

Welcome to remote work.

What took you so long? Did you have too many excuses? Let me clear them up for you.

If you have a hard time adapting to working from home or working remotely, suck it up and start doing it already. You have no more excuses and every reason to work remotely. This is the new normal. Get used to it. The office building does not miss you.

Remote work is nothing new. You were just missing out. Maybe it was not socially acceptable or you were constrained to one day a week because your employer had to justify using their bad real estate investment by keeping you coming back for more… commuting time. The fact is that really you don’t need an office to work nor work together today. Maybe you will realize this over the coming weeks and months.

You can actually accomplish more when working remotely if you:

  1. Have a computer that works quickly today. A laptop is commonplace nowadays so it can come with you where ever you want to work. A laptop might be issued by your employer.
  2. Have access to what you need to work with. Have fast internet bandwidth and steady power is a great start. You can get a mobile hotspot from even just about anywhere your mobile phone can if you don’t have internet available. VPN and permission to directory access to folders you might need are necessary too.
  3. Maintain focus (just like for any work if it is going to be done well)
  4. Manage your schedule for each day with an online calendar. Not just for work since you only have one set of 24 hours each day. Get things done in your life. Not just for work. That is why you are alive. Really.
  5. Work remotely at home and you don’t live alone, have a door that closes to block those living distractions (spouses, children, pets, other household dwellers, etc).
  6. Stop butt dragging. Get rid of unnecessary distractions. Turn off the TV (a crisis will still be there when you turn it back on and there will be a recap if it matters). Mute the phone, including the social media apps too since those are massive time sucks).
  7. Don’t commute to work. Walking further in your home is not a commute. Did you miss the traffic or hunting for a spot in the parking lot? Maybe they missed you. No tears were shed though.
  8. Stay away from the offices (drama, politics and pretend caring are all useless wastes of time) They don’t even justify the real estate spend for one desk nor how many square feet of office space your magic title will be allocated for you.
  9. Connect with people remotely online. That is why I use Zoom. I connect with clients that way, talk with friends that way and even record podcasts that way. Yes, you should collaborate online in a scheduled calendar fashion with the ‘location’ of a unique Zoom link.

If you don’t trust the people you work with, why are you still there? Find a new job or work for yourself.

If I can get 13-year-olds (with parental permission) to 80-year-olds to work via computer from their home remotely with me, so can you. And you thought your age was a good excuse? Think again. Do something productive already. Work and learn remotely.

I have worked from home for years now that I own my own businesses. I decline any new contracts/clients that are not remote. I was doing that well before COVID-19 became too popular. Why? I am a knowledge worker. An individual contributor. I am a consultant, podcaster and writer. I help people who want to be helped and ignore other distractions. I work in the digital world and have no interest in leaving my digital space.

Adapt to remote work already. You no longer have much choice.

If you want to work together, schedule a call with me here.

If you want me to come work in your office, contact someone else.

What is your excuse for not working remotely yet?

Questions?

Schedule a consulting call today

Tools I Use: Fiverr and Upwork

Disclosure: Links to other sites may be affiliate links that generate us a small commission at no extra cost to you.

When I need creative or design work done such as book covers or logos, I rely on Fiverr.

When I need technical work done such as podcast editing or copyediting, I rely on Upwork.

I have used these services for a few years now because they provide great value and great results.

The quality of the results is based on the individuals you find and task.

Both resources have a lot of talented people you can find with reviews, ratings, and skills you are looking for. I often filter to the most experienced people in their field who are very actively doing their craft really well.

The rates are very reasonable and you can even pay per task completed.

Keep in mind the remote workers need some context to complete the task you assign to them. Most will iterate the work they produce if you present feedback on what needs enhancement and how.

Have you tried Fiverr or Upwork?  If so, how did you like it?

Questions?

Tools I Use: Laptop

Disclosure: Links to other sites may be affiliate links that generate us a small commission at no extra cost to you.

I have no desktop computer. Why would I own desktop computer when I work remotely all the time?

I have no tablet. Why do I need another screen/device that does less than my laptop and/or my phone?

A computer should follow me where ever I go. Not the other way around.

In December 2014, I bought a 13 inch MacBook Air. Yes, it’s a Apple product. It is very light and easy to use.  It suits every purpose I need as a computer and its the only computer I use.

The best part is the battery life: 12 hours. Really. That is what I call freedom. Use it anywhere. For a long time.

As part of “work-life balance”, when I work the computer battery down to 1%, it is time to do something else. Network. Eat. Sleep. Recharge physically, mentally and electronically.

Since we are never off nowadays, I have my phone.

Update: In 2019, bought another Macbook Air after my laptop keyboard died after 5 years of daily work and 7 book written on it. It is a little faster now.

Questions?

Tools I Use: to test bandwidth

I work remotely quite often and I am traveling away from home up to 90 days per year.

Whenever I am in a new work environment, whether it is a client’s office, a co-working space, a coffee shop or wherever, I test the internet speeds to see what is available. This is better than assuming speeds before I start working.

http://speedtest.net is a free online service that measures the bandwidth (speed) and latency (time delay) of your internet connection.

Using this site is a good practice before using any hardline connection or wifi. This is especially good before a video conference call or uploading some new audio podcast files since both could be taxing on the internet bandwidth available as well as anyone’s level of patience.

Remember the speeds slower than 56k? I do. I also remember transferring digital photos for print publications back to the office on a daily basis via 56k. Not fun. Luckily, those days are over.

I recently went to a co-working space only to find 8 Mbps for upload and download speeds. That sounds reasonable until we factored in all the people who needed to do different video conferencing sessions where a clear video feed was critical to seeing the human-computer interactions (UX) being measured during the interviews.

Most video conferencing I have seen are more talking heads just like newscasts, which provides little to no value and suck up bandwidth for no reason. Unless there is a slide deck to be shared/presented, I commonly shut off the video camera and use ‘audio only’ to get clearer audio, where the value comes from anyhow. I don’t need to see someone to understand them. If they have a thick accent, it is actually easier to understand them by closing your eyes and focus on what is said. Try it and hear it yourself.

Questions?